Tilt-Shift query II
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    Plays with Light
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    Tilt-Shift query II

    by Plays with Light » Thu Jan 30, 2014 7:40 am

    Howdy all, this is mainly directed to Walter, but feel free to leap in with your thoughts too. Some of you folks have great technical thought in regard of photography, as well as the ability to create a good frame!

    Had a bit of a random thought, as I do from time to time. We know of parallax and the need to find the nodal point for panoramic composites to come together well and easily in PP. Was wondering if there would be any benefit from applying this to the tilt shift lens also and if there would be any benefit of leaving the lens still and moving the sensor/body when shifting the lens? This could be achieved very easily, without moving the tripod.

    Just wondering... I'm going to try it regardless, now that I've had the thought. I'll share the results here later.
    Feedback and honest, constructive criticism is greatly appreciated.
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    Re: Tilt-Shift query II

    by W G » Thu Jan 30, 2014 8:44 am

    Yes Alex,

    That is precisely the sort of plan for highest quality ..... however. It is really only necessary at close range OR if you have a dominant foreground feature that is close to the camera. It is a matter of mounting the lens to the tripod and allowing the camera to shift from side to side. Keep in mind though that this would place much higher stress on the rack and pinion than it is probably engineered to withstand.

    On a view camera it is usual to use the movements of the film standard to adjust the geometry of the image and the movements on the lens standard to adjust the focus. This is how I work with my Sinar but the little Linhof which you once posted a pic of from my Ebay listing does not allow direct shift at the rear — a trade off for portability and rigidity.

    Cheers,
    Walter Glover

    "Photography was not a bastard left by science on the doorstep of art, but a legitimate child of the Western pictorial tradition." —Robert Galassi
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    Re: Tilt-Shift query II

    by Plays with Light » Thu Jan 30, 2014 9:38 am

    W G wrote:Yes Alex,

    That is precisely the sort of plan for highest quality ..... however. It is really only necessary at close range OR if you have a dominant foreground feature that is close to the camera. It is a matter of mounting the lens to the tripod and allowing the camera to shift from side to side. Keep in mind though that this would place much higher stress on the rack and pinion than it is probably engineered to withstand.

    On a view camera it is usual to use the movements of the film standard to adjust the geometry of the image and the movements on the lens standard to adjust the focus. This is how I work with my Sinar but the little Linhof which you once posted a pic of from my Ebay listing does not allow direct shift at the rear — a trade off for portability and rigidity.

    Cheers,


    Excellent! Cheers, for that Walter. I can achieve it easily, using my macro rail to slide the body back and forth in the opposite direction and distance to the lens, it has millimetre markings on it for accuracy.
    Feedback and honest, constructive criticism is greatly appreciated.
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    Re: Tilt-Shift query II

    by W G » Thu Jan 30, 2014 10:01 am

    That is exactly how to do it Alex. I nearly bought a macro rail myself for just such an application.
    Walter Glover

    "Photography was not a bastard left by science on the doorstep of art, but a legitimate child of the Western pictorial tradition." —Robert Galassi

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