Modern Architecture
  • beeb
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    Modern Architecture

    by beeb » Sat Mar 12, 2016 8:28 pm

    Image
    Geometry by T. Flack, on Flickr

    Image
    Boomerang Seat by T. Flack, on Flickr

    Image
    Construction to scale by T. Flack, on Flickr
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    Eden
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    Re: Modern Architecture

    by Eden » Sat Mar 12, 2016 9:57 pm

    Pretty keen on the cranes mate

    and really like the silhouette of that building



    might need to run a aps-c sensor swab over the new sony
    I want to stand as close to the edge as I can without going over. Out on the edge you see all the kinds of things you can't see from the center.
    Kurt Vonnegut

    PPOK
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    Re: Modern Architecture

    by beeb » Sat Mar 12, 2016 11:05 pm

    Eden wrote:Pretty keen on the cranes mate

    and really like the silhouette of that building

    Cheers mate, the light was way too flat for the building silhouette IMO, but it's alright considering.

    Eden wrote:might need to run a aps-c sensor swab over the new sony

    I'm not sure if this is a typo or a reference to the dust spots.

    Either way, it is true the Sony is much more of a dust magnet than any of the Canon's I've owned. I think having so little distance to the lens mount doesn't help. Remove the lens, and yep - there's the sensor. I've had to use the in-built sensor cleaning (potent automated shaking of the in-body sensor stabilising to shake dust loose) already, but it might be time for another go. I reckon the felt flocking on the Metabones adaptor probably contributes to the dust deposits also - but regardless I need to become more diligent (and speedy!) when changing lenses.
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    Re: Modern Architecture

    by Eden » Sun Mar 13, 2016 11:16 am

    My bad!

    I disnt realise that your sony was a 42 mp full frame.
    Strewth that is a lot of camera they have squeezed into it.

    What is the idea of a backlit sensor?


    Also is the 78% coverage in the viewfinder noticable for you while shooting/framing the shot?

    And lastly, is there enough grip so that you are not accidentaly changing button or screen settings on occasion?


    I can understand why you have been out and about stalking glass for it.

    I assume you will keep the IR canon but rid yourself of the rest :)
    I want to stand as close to the edge as I can without going over. Out on the edge you see all the kinds of things you can't see from the center.
    Kurt Vonnegut

    PPOK
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    Re: Modern Architecture

    by beeb » Sun Mar 13, 2016 11:37 am

    Eden wrote:My bad!

    I disnt realise that your sony was a 42 mp full frame.
    Strewth that is a lot of camera they have squeezed into it.

    Yeah, there's a bit going on in there that's for sure!

    Eden wrote:What is the idea of a backlit sensor?

    In simple terms - in a conventional sensor there is wiring between the microlenses on the surface of the sensor and the photosites (light receptors/pixels). That wiring reflects some light away from the photosites, and reduces the light-gathering efficiency of the sensor. A backside illuminated sensor moves the wiring to the back of the sensor, so there is no obstructions in the light path to the photosites. The end result is a better light-gathering ability, and typcially lower output noise (as the light gathering is more efficient, the signals from the photosites don't have to be amplified as much...).

    This article gets a bit excited about it all, but seems to cover the information fairly well (I only skim-read it):
    http://www.extremetech.com/extreme/1497 ... hotography

    Eden wrote:Also is the 78% coverage in the viewfinder noticable for you while shooting/framing the shot?

    It's not 78% coverage - coverage is 100%, it's a 0.78x magnification viewfinder. As in it appears the same as 0.78x the 35mm sensor. So in theory it's roughly 27mm (across the diagonal) when looking into the viewfinder. It's ample viewfinder is the gist of it. :wink:

    Eden wrote:And lastly, is there enough grip so that you are not accidentaly changing button or screen settings on occasion?

    Buttons are out of the way enough, grip I could use a fraction more at times, but it's a good balance point IMO. I have big hands and don't get tangled up, so it must be pretty reasonable.

    Eden wrote:I can understand why you have been out and about stalking glass for it.

    Yep. There's pros and cons to a sensor that resolution in a 35mm frame. Getting a technically sharp shot is very lens-dependant. Though obviously there's more to a good shot than just getting it sharp, it's nice to have the option if desired.

    Eden wrote:I assume you will keep the IR canon but rid yourself of the rest :)

    I sold the IR body yesterday. I will look at getting another Sony and getting it converted in the future, but it will have to wait for a while.
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    Re: Modern Architecture

    by Eden » Mon Mar 14, 2016 11:22 am

    Cool article. Thanks fore the link.

    While reading the article my brain went of on another tangent....
    Would it be possible to easilly design a camera with a movable sensor that will go in and out left and right up and down and also move each corner in or out individually.
    So as to negate the need for a tilt/shift lens and allowing tilt/shift to be varied with any lens that is on the camera?

    No doubt it would work best with a mirorless


    (That would also enable an eos camera to wind the sensor forward and use glassless FD adapters and to adjust infinity focus on some retro lens setups or adapters of varying thicknesses)
    I want to stand as close to the edge as I can without going over. Out on the edge you see all the kinds of things you can't see from the center.
    Kurt Vonnegut

    PPOK
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    Re: Modern Architecture

    by Doug » Mon Mar 14, 2016 7:19 pm

    I like the last one the most.
    The seat and the cranes are such strong parts of the image they feel like they could be two separate images.
    I can't find a way to tie the two together, but that adds to the intrigue.
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    Re: Modern Architecture

    by beeb » Mon Mar 14, 2016 7:55 pm

    Doug wrote:I like the last one the most.
    The seat and the cranes are such strong parts of the image they feel like they could be two separate images.
    I can't find a way to tie the two together, but that adds to the intrigue.


    Thanks Doug, that's similar to what I was feeling at the time. My mind was wandering - I was amused by the difference in scale/size of the cranes and those seats that barely made it up to my knees. But the proximity made the chairs appear huge compared to the "tiny" cranes in the background. I also like the feeling that I could walk into the scene, sit down and watch as the sun slipped below the horizon.
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    Re: Modern Architecture

    by beeb » Mon Mar 14, 2016 8:22 pm

    For whatever it's worth, I did get some other variations on the cranes. Didn't mind these shots, but didn't really excite me all that much either.

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    Re: Modern Architecture

    by beeb » Mon Mar 14, 2016 8:33 pm

    Eden wrote:While reading the article my brain went of on another tangent....
    Would it be possible to easilly design a camera with a movable sensor that will go in and out left and right up and down and also move each corner in or out individually.
    So as to negate the need for a tilt/shift lens and allowing tilt/shift to be varied with any lens that is on the camera?

    No doubt it would work best with a mirorless


    (That would also enable an eos camera to wind the sensor forward and use glassless FD adapters and to adjust infinity focus on some retro lens setups or adapters of varying thicknesses)


    Easily designed, on the technical side yes - but it would make for a hugely cumbersome box as there would need to be room for huge amounts of sensor movement. Anyway - the main issue is the lenses. They would need to have a large (much larger than normal) image circle, or the extra movements aren't useable anyway. There is adapters existing already to use mirrorless camera in a manner similar to a view camera, but there is several physical limitations on the arrangement, such as wide angles being basically impossible as they need to be placed too close to the sensor to allow adjustment.

    Interestingly, Olympus or one of the other M4/3's manufacturers already has a "super shift" mode where the camera utilises sensor shifting and multiple exposures to create a high resolution version of a given scene. Usual caveats about moving subjects, etc still apply... But interesting regardless.

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