In Camera BW vs. Edited BW
  • poire
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    In Camera BW vs. Edited BW

    by poire » Tue Jan 20, 2009 7:05 pm

    Heyyy

    I've been taking a bunch of photos using the black and white setting in the camera, but i've been wondering, is this more effective than adding a black and white effect through photoshop? Would it be better to take all my photos on a basic setting, with no alterations to contrast/saturation etc. ?
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    bindiblue
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    by bindiblue » Tue Jan 20, 2009 7:07 pm

    I take all my photos in colour then adjust in photoshop :)
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    by avkomp » Tue Jan 20, 2009 7:12 pm

    I have to say that shooting in colour in the camera and adjusting in photoshop would give you more versatility.

    you can have a colour image too if you need it.
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    by erth » Tue Jan 20, 2009 7:20 pm

    I shoot in colour, then apply some funky filters, like the Tri-X filter from alien skin. I prefer this so I have the flexibility to choose b&w or colour post shoot, and also I can use the colour information to adjust the tones in photoshop instead of relying on the camera.
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    by fillum » Wed Jan 21, 2009 12:20 am

    I have also been using in-camera b&w conversion recently. The big advantage for me is that I can compare the b&w image to the scene at the time of shooting, so eventually I'll be able to 'see' better in b&w (that's what I'm hoping anyway).

    I think the main consideration regarding in-camera conversion is whether you shoot jpeg or raw files. Raw files can be adjusted quite a bit in post-processing whereas jpegs are much more limited in how much adjustment can be applied. If you need to shoot jpeg to get b&w in-camera, it might be better to shoot raw and do your b&w conversions in Photoshop or similar.


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    Dug
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    by Dug » Wed Jan 21, 2009 12:31 am

    I would always try to record the maximum information possible then dump some afterwards.

    I shoot in colour then convert to B&W afterwards.

    ( I do miss shooting B&W film though :cry: )
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    photoboy
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    by photoboy » Wed Jan 21, 2009 10:05 am

    Poire,

    This is an important point. The B&W function on your camera will give you the camera manufacturers rendition of what B&W should look like. Similarly if you use PS or another software and click "convert to B&W" then you will get the programmers idea of what B&W looks like - and this is often an emulation of a standard old B&W film like Kodak Tri X Pan.

    If that's what you want then OK :)

    avkomp wrote:

    adjusting in photoshop would give you more versatility


    This is elluding to the fact that sophisticated software like PS allows an almost limitless number of B&W renditions of the same color image by mixing different amounts of red/green/blue into a finished B&W image ... this is not "adding a B&W effect" - but rendering the data in the file into a grey scaled gamut. See example below:

    Image

    Notice how different all of these are - it is not just the exposure; look at the lips compared to the skin color ... no one of these is "correct" and the others wrong; it's entirely a creative choice :)

    In short - shoot color (RAW)
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    jota_au
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    by jota_au » Wed Jan 21, 2009 10:40 am

    I tend to shoot in Black and White but using RAW most of the time, you will get to see your shot in Black and White on the Camera but also retain the information to change it back to Colour if needed. One of the disadvantages, I had to go buy myself an External 1TB Drive to start storing my photos, LOL
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    by Kristine65 » Wed Jan 21, 2009 9:24 pm

    Thank godd for Photoboy. I was going to attempt to explain the different ways to desaturate an image in CS and here he's even posted examples :D

    Shoot colour. Once it's gone... it's gooorrrN!
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    by can't shoot » Thu Jan 07, 2010 11:37 am

    just wondering, has anyone had great results when they do the in-camera processing of their B&W's and then edit later in PS?

    and what's everyone's favourite method of converting to B&W? Lightroom? Channel Mix? PS Black & White?
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    Ken182
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    by Ken182 » Wed Jan 13, 2010 1:52 am

    Well explained PB. The majority are gathering colour and editing afterwards.

    Can't shoot: the best method of conversion is the one that gives you a final image as you "saw" it.

    Refer to PB answer for clarification
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