stupid question on exposure
  • sclater29
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    stupid question on exposure

    by sclater29 » Mon Oct 31, 2011 2:48 am

    stupid question of the week but is there much difference between shooting in tv/av and manual mode(shutter priority/apperture priority for nikon folk). and what if we throw the "P" setting in (the one with pre programed exposures) how does that go.

    i find i can use the tv/av modes with relative ease and decent results however when i try to shoot in manual mode i struggle to get the right shutter speed vs appeture setting furthermore i wonder if any of you have a secret to getting it or its just a experience thing.

    currently i shoot in the tv/av modes,if thiers a huge change of lighting conditions or i strugle with the tv/av settings then ill adjust iso. is this approach ok or should i be in manual.

    shooting on canon 5dmk2 if that matters
    canon 5Dmk2, EF24-105L IS USM,Ef16-35 f2.8L II USM,Ef 70-300 f4-5.6L IS USM, photo shop cs5, photomatix.http://www.flickr.com/photos/sclater29/
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    Busiboy
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    by Busiboy » Mon Oct 31, 2011 5:22 am

    I'll generally shoot in aperture mode most of the time, I find controlling the depth of field most important, I'll hoot shutter mode when I need to control that most, ie when shooting Motorsport and trying to create motion blur etc. I don't often require to control both shutter and aperture with variable iso.

    I shoot manual when in the studio using off camera flash.

    Hope this helps
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    JazzXP
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    by JazzXP » Mon Oct 31, 2011 8:23 am

    Busiboy wrote:I'll generally shoot in aperture mode most of the time, I find controlling the depth of field most important, I'll hoot shutter mode when I need to control that most, ie when shooting Motorsport and trying to create motion blur etc. I don't often require to control both shutter and aperture with variable iso.

    I shoot manual when in the studio using off camera flash.

    Hope this helps

    I was about to say exactly the same thing. Personally I'm usually on aperture priority, however this year, I'm often on manual as I'm usually shooting glamour under strobes. Even when using on camera flash (ie. TTL mode), I still use manual so I can play around with ambient light more.
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    Dug
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    by Dug » Mon Oct 31, 2011 6:07 pm

    I have actually found reversing the logic works well for me.

    I usually shoot in P mode, the camera has a higher IQ than I do so I let it do the work for me :D

    I use A/ AV aperture mode if I am shooting fast moving subject and need a high ( or slow ) shutter speed. by choosing A you can select the most appropriate aperture ( f2.8 for high speed ) and the camera will automatically choose the highest shutter speed available for the exposure in changing light conditions.

    Similar for S/ TV shutter priority time value if I need a long DOF

    By choosing the slowest shutter speed that is usable at the time I know the camera will choose the smallest aperture available.

    Using flash depends on the job and the subject I can use any mode depending on the situation.


    As with anything these can be changed to suit the job or the situation but try the system, if you can get your head around it, it works quite well.
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    Mark675
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    by Mark675 » Mon Oct 31, 2011 6:25 pm

    There are no stupid questions.
    Only stupid answers.

    I echo busiboy and JazzXP's responses.

    You are on the right track as iso should be the last resort setting.

    It all comes down to what you are shooting whether the constant should be "time" (motion blur or to freeze action) / "light" (minimum movement blur when there is not much light or overexposure if there is too much light) or "depth of field"(cool looking blur or maximum focus).

    When using manual (which i try to use as often as possible)
    you need to keep an eye on the exposure metering bar or whatever it is called.
    If you cannot centre the pointer/arrow/dash in the centre of the metering bar to get a 0 exposure by overiding your time value or aperture value that's when you have to resort to changing the iso settings.

    I hope this is not one of those stupid answers that i mentioned. :lol:

    Mark
    Last edited by Mark675 on Mon Oct 31, 2011 6:31 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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    by K1W1 » Mon Oct 31, 2011 6:26 pm

    Tv/Av is only manual mode with one of the options (either aperture or shutter speed) preset. It's nothing more and nothing less and certainly nothing magic.

    Lets say in Av mode you select f8, the camera will automatically select the correct shutter speed to match lets say 1/250 sec BUT there is nothing to stop you increasing or decreasing the shutter speed as much or as little as you like.

    In Manual mode you look at a scene and you decide that f8 will be where you want to be aperture wise and you then look through the viewfinder and scroll through the shutter speed settings until the camera tells you that 1/250 sec will give you the correct exposure, you then accept that (just like in Av mode) or change the shutter speed a little to over or under expose.

    Tv and Av or on Nikons S and A modes are nothing special the are just there to make life a little easier.

    FWIW I use Av or Aperture mode 95% of the time. For Sports I set the aperture then use maximum and minimum shutter speed settings with auto iso limits. For normal shooting I use A and manually select the iso to get an acceptable shutter speed it I have to or use a touch of exposure compensation. I will admit to using P for flash photography at times I find it tends to give a better result particularly for happy snap type flash photos.
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    by Dug » Mon Oct 31, 2011 8:19 pm

    Mark675 wrote:There are no stupid questions.
    Only stupid answers.

    Mark


    Or to quote Mr Garrison

    There are no stupid questions, Only stupid people :lol:

    I find the ISO capabilities of modern digital cameras just amazing.

    For stock work I am more than happy to use anything up to 1600 ISO considering this was the fastest colour film I ever used for a job and it was as grainy as hell the results from a D700 are nothing short of amazing in my opinion.

    if I need speed just dial it in is a simple option. I generally shoot at about 400 ISO but have no issues with going from 200 to 1,600.

    I think the most important thing is to use your camera so you become comfortable and confident with it. It is the same as learning to drive a car or ride a bike, the more you do it and the more difficult the conditions you use it in the more you get to understand how it reacts under different circumstances.

    The 3 basics rules are Practice, Practice and Practice :wink:
    "Photography to the amateur is recreation, to the professional it is work, and hard work too, no matter how pleasurable it may be."

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