When "Full Manual" isnt Full manual.
  • Mattyp
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    When "Full Manual" isnt Full manual.

    by Mattyp » Wed Jan 18, 2012 7:45 pm

    So just when I thought I had my camera worked out the other day it threw a spanner in the works.
    Whilst shooting low light action shots with my D90/Sigma10-20. I was getting a bit of silhouetting and wanted to highlight the subject a tad so turned the flash on.
    This is where my problem started and has me a bit confused. I was using a shutter speed of 600, but as soon as i turned the flash on the shutter speed changed to 200, and could not be sped up regardless of ISO or Aperture.
    Why is this so? :?
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    by Busiboy » Wed Jan 18, 2012 8:24 pm

    That's the maximum sync speed of nikon, canon and olympus is 1/250th

    There are ways to up it sometimes but generally with a separate flash unit.
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    by beeb » Wed Jan 18, 2012 8:27 pm

    Probably because that's the fastest shutter speed that can sync with the flash. I can't remember the science, but basically if you were able to set the exposure time shorter, it'd leave a big black area on the image where it hasn't taken in the flash...
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    LOZ
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    by LOZ » Wed Jan 18, 2012 8:29 pm

    From memory the D70 was 1/500 sec gee I miss mine
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    by Dug » Wed Jan 18, 2012 9:52 pm

    you can no longer open the back of cameras to explain this like you could on film cameras :(

    the basics are that the shutter is a blind that moves across the sensor plane opening it to incoming light.

    Below 1/250th there is a moment where the entire sensor is open/exposed at one moment so when the flash goes off the whole sensor is lit.

    Above 1/250th only a section of the sensor is exposed as a slit travels across the sensor exposing it to light, modern cameras prevent photos from being taken in this mode. Older cameras you would just get an a partially exposed piece of film depending on the shutter speed that was chosen.

    Between the lens shutters do not have this problem as they always fully open for every photo. Hence cameras with between the lens shutters have a higher flash sync capability to focal plane shutter.

    Hope this helps
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    by Dug » Wed Jan 18, 2012 9:53 pm

    when using flash you should not really need a high shutter speed that often as you rely on the speed of the flash duration to stop action and movement
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    by Remorhaz » Thu Jan 19, 2012 7:29 am

    NB: I have a D90 and the sync speed on the D90 is 1/200th, my newer D7000 has a 1/250th sync speed.

    If you have a compatable external flash and you aren't too far from the subject (the flash at least) then you could use AutoFP (high speed sync) which will let you sync at up to 1/8000th (maybe 1/4000th on the D90).
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    by Dalzine » Thu Jan 19, 2012 8:43 am

    I know my 50D will not limit your shutter speed, it just shows a black bar along the bottom of the image which gets larger the faster you go.

    However, if you have a bright enough sky then turn your camera upside down and the black bar disappears as the sky is bright enough to register on the sensor. :D

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    by heartyfisher » Thu Jan 19, 2012 4:32 pm

    You should be able to go to higher shutter speeds But you will need to change your flash setting to "Auto FP High-Speed Sync" mode. You do loose some Flash power so you cant shoot as far.. and you loose the ability to absolutely "Freeze" a subject.. since the flash duration is increased to 1/200 of a second instead of the usual 1/10,000 or less

    @LOZ : D70? ... yup.. I could flash sync at 1/8000 of sec.. just tape up the 2 digital contacts on the hotshoe!
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    by Mattyp » Thu Jan 19, 2012 5:24 pm

    thanks for the explanations, all makes sense! 8)

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