Movies
  • beeb
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    Movies

    by beeb » Sun Feb 07, 2016 12:50 am

    Well, just got home from seeing "The Revenant". Not an easy watch (long and pretty brutal in parts), but WOW is it beautifully filmed.

    Some really stunning use of UWA's and also close-up tracking shots.

    Got me wondering what other good flicks there are out there for pure cinematic visual appeal. ie: 2001: A Space Oddesey is still visually stunning to this day, and No Country For Old Men springs to mind for it's dramatic vistas and lighting.

    So go on - tell me what I should be keeping an eye out for. :wink:
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    Re: Movies

    by Eden » Sun Feb 07, 2016 1:05 am

    Apocalypse now and the deer hunter are still two of the most visual movies I have ever seen not including 2001.

    there are heaps but if I really had to pick it would be "apocalypse now"

    so worth a watch or 4.

    all the so called cool Brandow stuff was trifled by the brilliant intro and war/river scenes with the entry to Brandows rivers end fortress at death waters edge.


    interpretation of drug taking, use of colour, darkness, light and lack of!

    silence and noise for accompaniment and compliment.

    a wonderful movie!
    from dark to light and in between,

    other than that I would say the most visually impacting movie visually on a
    cig inclusive level was "the wall"
    awesome bang for buck on a big screen to this day if you can handle the thin ice!

    :)





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    Re: Movies

    by W G » Sun Feb 07, 2016 2:46 am

    Pretty much anything by Kubrick — especially "Barry Lyndon". Early in his life Kubrick was a photographer and the impact of that shows consistently — he creates an image and then lets the action take place within it.

    "Amelie" is a tour de force of designing an entire production around one lens.

    As you'd expect, I'll put a vote for some B&W and Cinema Noir classics like "Casablanca" and "The Third Man".

    Of course, the truly magnificent impact of the DOP is to be unobtrusive a lot of the time and set a look that re-inforces the mood of a piece.

    "Citizen Kane" takes things to extremes with sets designed to exaggerate the optical distortion of the optics. Gregg Tolland set new boundaries.

    I agree about "Apocalypse Now" and would add "The Godfather" — nothing short of brilliant. In Apocalypse Storaro had Marlon Brando on screen for minutes without fully revealing him. Breathtaking for me. Similar tenebrous wonders happen with the Godfather's family in the back of a car at night. The timing of the flashing streetlights is such that as each actor has a line of dialogue is is hit by a blob of light in a stunningly choreographed ballet of lamps and gobos.

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    Re: Movies

    by Doug » Sun Feb 07, 2016 3:40 am

    beeb wrote:Well, just got home from seeing "The Revenant". Not an easy watch (long and pretty brutal in parts), but WOW is it beautifully filmed.

    Some really stunning use of UWA's and also close-up tracking shots.


    It's stunning alright. The ultra wide shots are a stand out plus the sound design.
    As if it was not hard enough to film, it was also done with natural light during fixed periods of the day (no doubt plenty of post afterwards to give a consistent look)
    Same director did "Birdman", great camera work also but I couldn't get into that one.

    Here are a collection of featurettes on the making of Revenant (spoiler alert)
    http://www.slashfilm.com/making-of-the- ... he-scenes/

    Another movie from last year that used natural light was "The Lobster"
    A strange po-face delivery satirical comedy that was one of my favorites, definitely the most memorable.

    Another fan of the ultra wide is Terry Gilliam, with "Brazil" being a good example, great set design in this movie also.

    For distinctive camera work I really like anything by Wes Anderson, so formal in the camera placement, panning and tracking shots, it adds to the quirky humor and style.
    "The Grand Budapest Hotel" is his most resent one.

    I wanted to be impressed more by Quentin Tarantino's "The hateful eight" for resurrecting the use of Ultra Panavision 70 film, though I didn't see it in the cinema.
    Still enjoyed the movie.
    Bit of trivia: The guitar destroyed in the movie was from the 1870's on loan from the Martin Guitar Museum. Kurt Russell was not informed of this nor that it was supposed to be swapped for a double.

    Spielberg is a great story teller with a camera, he's done some fine arty ones, but Jaws still does it for me.

    Many more of coarse who bring that something extra to a film with their vision and camera usage.
  • beeb
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    Re: Movies

    by beeb » Sun Feb 07, 2016 1:17 pm

    Thanks folks - looks like I have several movies to add to me "To see..." list. :)

    W G wrote:Pretty much anything by Kubrick — especially "Barry Lyndon". Early in his life Kubrick was a photographer and the impact of that shows consistently — he creates an image and then lets the action take place within it.

    "Amelie" is a tour de force of designing an entire production around one lens.

    As you'd expect, I'll put a vote for some B&W and Cinema Noir classics like "Casablanca" and "The Third Man".

    Of course, the truly magnificent impact of the DOP is to be unobtrusive a lot of the time and set a look that re-inforces the mood of a piece.

    "Citizen Kane" takes things to extremes with sets designed to exaggerate the optical distortion of the optics. Gregg Tolland set new boundaries.

    I agree about "Apocalypse Now" and would add "The Godfather" — nothing short of brilliant. In Apocalypse Storaro had Marlon Brando on screen for minutes without fully revealing him. Breathtaking for me. Similar tenebrous wonders happen with the Godfather's family in the back of a car at night. The timing of the flashing streetlights is such that as each actor has a line of dialogue is is hit by a blob of light in a stunningly choreographed ballet of lamps and gobos.

    Whatever possessed me as a kid to give away working in the movies to opt for stills?


    Kubrick's films are several of my favourites. 2001: A Space Oddessey, A Clockwork Orange and Full Metal Jacket all excel at their ability to tell the tale with the scene and are all strikingly different.

    I never that about Amelie, quite the achievement and a great film.

    And yes - there's some excellent scenes in The Godfather!
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    Re: Movies

    by Plays with Light » Sun Feb 07, 2016 10:59 pm

    I can't believe that no one has mentioned old Hitchcock as yet! For masterful use of light and scene, he's hard pressed to beat, in my eyes.

    The Fifth Element has a great sense of quirk through its cinematography.

    I'm also a sucker for Spike Lee's productions, good cinematography there and good story telling for the most part. He has had the odd flop along the way, mainly due to movies being too long for audiences that want and need to be spoon fed their visual fodder.
    Feedback and honest, constructive criticism is greatly appreciated.
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    Re: Movies

    by Doug » Mon Feb 08, 2016 12:15 am

    Plays with Light wrote:I can't believe that no one has mentioned old Hitchcock as yet! For masterful use of light and scene, he's hard pressed to beat, in my eyes.

    The Fifth Element has a great sense of quirk through its cinematography.


    I haven't revisited a lot of the cinema classics with an eye for how they where done.

    The Birds and Psycho stick in my mind from Hitchcock.
    Full Metal Jacket and Dr Strangelove from Kubrick.

    Love Fifth Element as well as Blade Runner and Alien, all set a bar for style and immersion.
    The Andromeda Strain (1971) is another that I remember being riveting.

    I have a to do list of movies to watch. Never seen Citizen Kane for instance, but I hear so much about it.
    Might have to add a few more from this thread.
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    Re: Movies

    by heartyfisher » Tue Feb 09, 2016 1:20 am

    I was pleasantly surprised by "Slum-dog Millionaire" .. "Hero" was really quite nice ! also "300" had a look .. "Life of Pi" was nicely weird :-) and there was this Indian movie which I cant remember the name of and had to read subs LOL !! but was surprisingly nice .. not so much the movie but the cinematography :-) LOL

    PS found a snippet :-) https://youtu.be/YKDZ4zQCQnI
    .... and trailer : https://youtu.be/J4y-hhs4aD0
    Moments of Light : D7K D610 18-200 150 12-24 24-70 70-200 + C&C very welcome!
    Being a photographer is a lot like being a Christian: Some people look at you funny but do not see the amazing beauty all around them - heartyfisher.
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    Re: Movies

    by Doug » Thu Mar 17, 2016 10:09 pm

    An interview with "The Revenant's" cinematographer,

    http://www.dpreview.com/interviews/4663 ... el-lubezki

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